My husband had BG levels of 400 for months and now feels dizzy and nauseated with BG in the 250 range... any advice

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Patients Diabetes (Type 2)

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Member Carenity
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My husband had recently lost a lot of weight, and he was drinking a lot and urinating very frequently. I decided to buy a cheap glucose monitor, and his reading was "hi," meaning he was over 600. We took him to the hospital, and they admitted him. He doesn't have insurance, so they released him the next day with some insulin and prescriptions. Fortunately I was able to find a program that lets us pay $99 a month for all the insulin he needs. 

My question is this... Since he has been home, all his readings have been in the 250 range. The doctor said his average over the past few months was 400. I'm wondering if being so high for so long means that his body feels like he's too low right now because he has experienced some dizziness and nausea. Does anyone have experience with those kind of high readings for so long?

I'm pretty upset because he's been to the doctor for some health problems including bruising and swelling in his face. They just kept giving him antibiotics and never tested his blood. He didn't tell them about all his symptoms because I guess he felt that was normal. I'm just hoping lasting damage was not done. 

Beginning of the discussion - 10/8/19

My husband had BG levels of 400 for months and now feels dizzy and nauseated with BG in the 250 range... any advice
Member Carenity
Posted on

I don't understand doctors that don't test blood sugar. And I'm also upset that doctors just tell you something like, "It looks like you have diabetes, let's try this pill and we'll check again sometime", treating it like it's no big deal. It IS a big deal. Diabetes is a devastating disease, and having it is emotionally depressing.

I have to tell you that 250 is too high (unless you're testing right after a meal, I guess, which is the wrong time to test). Two hours after starting a meal is one recommended time to test, and you want it to be under 180. Other times are in the morning after a 12 hour fast, you want it no more than 120 max (which is pre-diabetic, it really should be under 100 to be healthy), and before meals and bedtime under 120 or so. 

You MUST do more about this disease than your doctor is doing.  Look on the internet for the phone number for maybe the American Diabetes Association, see if you can get into a diabetes teaching group in your area. Get informed with good sound medical advice, and avoid listening to anyone with miracle cures.  Schedule an appointment with a nutritionist or dietitian (I'm not sure what the difference is).

Get a good, up to date book about diabetes. You have a lot to learn.

I pray that there isn't any permanent damage that's been done, and I wish you all the best.

And think about getting a new doctor. Seriously.