What types of food are hiding artificial sugars? Living with type 2 diabetes

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Patients Diabetes (Type 2)

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Posted on

I saw my doctor yesterday and he really hammered on me to look out for artificial sugars. I thought I was doing a good job avoiding them but I guess not... What kinds of things are they hidden in?

Beginning of the discussion - 7/1/21

What types of food are hiding artificial sugars? Living with type 2 diabetes

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Posted on

Hello @diabeticsurv‍, thank you for opening this discussion! It's true that sometimes there can be sugars - artificial or not - hidden in all sorts of foods and products without us realizing it! Let me tag some other members who can possibly share with you!

Hello all, how are you today? Do you pay attention to artificial sugars and the sugar content of what you consume? What types of products contain artificial sugars? Do you avoid them all together or do you just try to limit them?
@Jessence@Mseratt1977@kevinc328@Lesley@lisaespo52@autumn0909@Leavnsoon@Mary1998@pahubbard@Bvarghese@Denorah@Carmawoman@juju345@Candrews@Nananancy@therese@Metalbookworm‍ 

Feel free to share here!

Take care,
Courtney

What types of food are hiding artificial sugars? Living with type 2 diabetes


Posted on

Hello all. Almost Friday.  Hope you all have a good holiday weekend,  even if you're just trying to be more comfortable.  I hope it's a quiet time for you all. 

I'm a diabetic type 1.5. Many don't know about this type.  LADA - Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults.  There are features of type 1 as well as type 2. Increased weight is not usually seen in one's younger years in to adulthood,  as it is often seen in type 2. It is more difficult to treat than both type 1 and type 2. If one does become overweight, weight loss tends not to impact high glucose. 

I'm an RN., C.C.C. The C's are certifications in specialty areas: public health,  psychology,  and addictions.  When I was first diagnosed with Diabetes,  I was vehemently trying to avoid sugars, and to this day I read labels diligently.  I do allow myself a yay now and then with sugar in it,  but use a booklet I have to choose dibs that I can cut out that day so as to styrene to keep from having my glucose spike.  For example  if I want some ice cream in the evening now and then,  I'll cut out two starch servings earlier in the day.  That way the sugar in the ice cream won't overwhelm me. I believe that sugar is not good for ANYONE in more than small amounts,  as,  it causes inflammation in our bodies which tends to cause other problems over time.  I, for one,  don't want any more inflammation inflammation in this cancer- ridden body than I can possibly avoid.  It would be best to take in fewer carbohydrates in general,  also,  as,  they break down in to sugars in our bodies and aren't as helpful to us nutritionally as foods lower in CHO's,(carbohydrates). Simple CHO's, as candy,  sugary drinks,  certain cereals, etc., are very high in sugar and don't give or bodies anything very healthy.  It IS Ok to have a SMALL amount as a special treat ONCE IN A WHILE. Complex CHO's, such as corn,  bread, potatoes, pasta, rice,  etc., also yield sugar in our bodies but not a s quickly and to a lesser degree than simple CHO's. They are more healthy for us but also should be limited.  A rule of thumb is that a serving of various foods should have less than 14 Gm,(grams) of CHO. Choose whole wheat bread and pasta if possible,  and long grain and wild rice over white rice if possible.  Portion control is very important. 

Proteins are very important to support most functions in our bodies. Promotion of healthy nutrition for the entire body, cellular reproduction,  wound healing and to much to discuss here.  Yet,  portion size is still important with proteins also.  Fish has less fat than many other proteins and so is desirable for most diets for most people.  Chicken and turkey are also good choices.  Even pork is thought to be healthier than red meats. Fats have different subtypes which I won't get into here. Put simply,  or bodies as adults NEED little fat for support and function.  When fat is broken down in our bodies,  it yields considerably more sugar than protein and complex CHO's.  Therefore,  low fat diets are much healthier for adults than otherwise.  Therefore, try to limit your fat intake daily. 

With cancer,  healthy nutrition is extremely important.  Our bodies are fighting an enemy.  We need to feed ourselves good foods that will support us in our fights against this enemy.  If it becomes difficult  to eat well,  we should talk with a nutritionist who can help us and our physicians to obtain nutritional supplements that are meant to give us proper nutrition in easier to tolerate amounts and textures.  Even if you're eating well now,  consider talking to a nutritionist for extra understanding of your body's individual needs both now and in case of troublesome times. They know more than physicians about nutrition and will make suggestions for you and your doctors to consider. 

I have SO MUCH  more to share but fatigue is an unwanted companion to me now along with pain.  Love to you all.  Let's hold each other up. 

What types of food are hiding artificial sugars? Living with type 2 diabetes


Posted on

I can say I do pay attention to artificial sugars and I do know that watching food labels are key and using them in very small amounts is key… I have heard that some of these sweeteners can also have effects on blood sugar long after you have eaten them as well

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